Global Initiatives

project_faith

burn_care_FINAL

women_violence3

humanitarian

socal_survivor

SeniorBurn

bibi1

Bibi Aisha

At 16,her father promised her hand in marriage and she was handed over to a large family,who she claims were all members of the Taliban in oruzgan province.”I spent two years with them and became a prisoner,”she says.Tortured and abused.
2014-04-16T11:43:24+00:00
bibi1
At 16,her father promised her hand in marriage and she was handed over to a large family,who she claims were all members of the Taliban in oruzgan province.”I spent two years with them and became a prisoner,”she says.Tortured and abused.
Faith

Faith Wanjugo

"Project Faith" is the Grossman Burn Foundation's patient support program. Project Faith provides treatment and support to victims of burn or related injuries that have no others means of obtaining quality healthcare.

This initiative is named after the Foundation's ¬first recipient from Kenya, Faith Wanjugo, who was dis¬figured after suffering horri¬d burns in a cooking accident in her village. The surgeons at Grossman Burn Center provided their surgical services to Faith at no charge. Faith returned to her three young children and her village in September 2009 after undergoing nine reconstructive surgeries.
2014-04-16T11:44:38+00:00
Faith
“Project Faith” is the Grossman Burn Foundation’s patient support program. Project Faith provides treatment and support to victims of burn or related injuries that have no others means of obtaining quality healthcare. This initiative is named after the Foundation’s ¬first
Screen-Shot-2014-04-18-at-11.53

Jyoti

The GBF's latest patient was involved in a kitchen fire the winter of 1986. She was attempting to light a kerosene stove to cook breakfast. It exploded, catching her gown on fire and resulting in severe burns. She was rescued by her neighbors and taken to Bir Hospital in Nepal.

She was hospitalized for about four months where she underwent multiple procedures and very painful wound care. At the time of her accident, she had two children: a 3-year-old daughter and a 2-year-old son. Her husband worked at the time so her children were taken care of by multiple family members. Her brother helped feed her and helped with dressing changes, as her injuries were so severe she could not use her hands to do normal activities. While in the hospital, she fretted over whether she would be able to be a good mother, for when she returned home, she would be without the use of her hands and it would be difficult for her children to look at her.

Her first priority was to get back home and figure out a way to overcome these obstacles. Soon after being home, she learned to feed her kids and wash dishes with her severe hand deformities and wash her clothes using her feet. She even recalls blood on the washed clothes as her wounds were not fully healed. She refers to that accomplishment as being one of the happiest moments of her life.

During those years, her oldest daughter and son could not attend school as her hospital stay had taken a financial strain on the family. Mrs. Shrestha's family all put in money to help pay for her hospital bills and her medication. When more surgeries were recommended, she opted instead to put her children's needs first and deal with her scars and deformities as best she could.

Around five years after the injury, Mrs. Shrestha began managing a family-owned noodle business. She only worked in the factory because her experiences at the open market had been humiliating, with all the questions about her injuries. She had worked there until her visit to the US six months ago.

At this point, she has lived throughout her adult life with severe contractures of her bilateral upper extremities, and neck. She has very limited motion in her fingers, though despite this, she continued to work in Nepal, providing a home for her children and caring for her family. She has been very self-conscious about her scars for several years and will not leave her home without a shawl that covers her arms and neck area. This was evident as tears rolled down her face when her shawl was removed to get a complete examination of her injuries.

She states that her primary good feelings come from her activity and her children. Up until this time, she has ignored her own needs and has focused on her children. She is very limited by the functionality and obviously not satisfied with the overall appearance. The appearance and function of her hands are her greatest concern. In addition to her hands, she has desire to improve her flexion contracture across her right and left arm, as well as her neck.

She has already extended her visa and is living in Louisiana with her daughter. The family is willing to travel to seek any help they can to help their mother regain function and relieve the pain, both physically and emotionally, that these injuries have left her with over these last 25 years.

This family has come to us for help in hopes to improve their mother's quality of life. They have very little financial means and are appreciative of any assistance we can offer them. I feel this case could not only significantly change one patients life, but possibly others that are unaware of our services at Grossman Burn Center.

Dr. Alexander Majidian agreed to be the lead surgeon on this case here in California. He released the contractures to the patient's arms and neck in a series of two operations. She returned temporarily to Louisiana for physical therapy until her visa ran out.

Surgeons donated their services through Grossman Burn Foundation.
2014-04-23T11:16:40+00:00
Screen-Shot-2014-04-18-at-11.53
The GBF’s latest patient was involved in a kitchen fire the winter of 1986. She was attempting to light a kerosene stove to cook breakfast. It exploded, catching her gown on fire and resulting in severe burns. She was rescued
mashoom2

Mahsoom

Maybe the war will be won in the operation theater, not the military theater of operations. How are the jihadists going to counter this:

There's a little boy, just 6, in Afghanistan who was terribly disfigured when a propane gas burner in his families poor home exploded. Brace yourself. This is not pretty.
Mahsoom -- that's his name -- was in perpetual pain. He could barely eat or talk. When he was awake, there was endless pain, and at night, his skin itched terribly. And to top it off, the kids were cruel.

There is not a single burn center in Afghanistan, but the father knew unquestioningly what to do and where to go. He took the boy to the nearest American base because he knew what was there. Not a burn center. No, what was there was America's biggest strength: It's big heart.

Here's how it happened, according to the OC Register:

Army Capt. Jay Berendzen’s [the local base commander] heart went out to the boy, but there was little he could do, according to a team account: The Army evacuated only people with life-threatening conditions, and there wasn’t a burn center in all of Afghanistan, much less a surgeon who could execute the many demanding operations that Mahsoom’s injuries required. The captain sent Mahsoom on his way, but didn’t forget the boy’s silence and how he hid his face. As Mahsoom grew, the scar tissue would become tighter and tighter, more and more painful.

The captain started hunting for charities to take up Mahsoom’s cause. He came upon a news story about an Afghan girl named Zubaida, burned horribly in a kitchen fire, who was treated for free by Sherman Oaks plastic surgeon Dr. Peter Grossman. An e-mail exchange later, Grossman had agreed to do for Mahsoom what he had done for Zubaida, as long as someone took care of the boy’s travel and cared for him for the six months he’d be in the U.S. for treatment.

Soon e-mail popped into the inbox of SadiqTawfiq, owner of the Khyber Pass gallery in Laguna Beach. Tawfiq, who spends a great deal of time in his native Afghanistan, was founder and president of the Rotary International Club in Herat. He was also a board member of the Laguna Hills-based International Orphan Care, a charity that runs schools and orphan centers in Afghanistan. Could the organization help? He shot off more e-mails. Of course it could help.

Many others felt the same way. The Children's Burn Foundation.Childspring. Dr. Abdul and SharifaAsat of Van Nuys, who already had three children, agreed to take Mahsoom into his home for as long as the treatment took. International Orphan Care raised about $12,000, and eight boys calling themselves SATA – Super Achievement of America – pitched in more than $1,200 by doing chores, asking their families for matching donations and hosting a hamburger cookout for their soccer teams, classmates and neighbors in Laguna Niguel Regional Park.

After months of filling out paperwork and waiting for permissions, a nervous Mahsoom boarded a plane for Los Angeles. Zubaida, the girl who had endured all he was about to endure just a few years before, was by his side. She would accompany him to America, stay for the duration with the Grossmans and get follow-up treatment of her own.
The Children's Burn Foundation funded Mahsoom's case and partnered with the GBF to ensure follow up surgeries in Kabul, Afghanistan.
2014-04-23T11:18:51+00:00
mashoom2
Maybe the war will be won in the operation theater, not the military theater of operations. How are the jihadists going to counter this: There’s a little boy, just 6, in Afghanistan who was terribly disfigured when a propane gas
sorie

SORIE

Two years ago in Sierra Leone, 12 year-old Sorie was sent out to buy kerosene for his family's oil lamp and inadvertently spilled it on his shirt. That evening, as he went to use the toilet, he held the lamp under his shirt so it would not go out and the flames immediately consumed and horribly burned him. Fortunately, doctors in Ghana agreed to perform Sorie's reconstructive surgery for free. As of June 2010, Sorie has undergone three surgeries, with more to follow. Sorie has settled back in to his life in Sierra Leone and is doing well and going to school. He is happy that he is able to close his mouth and eyes and turn his head again. The Grossman Burn Foundation has aided Sorie by providing much needed funding for his travel expenses to visit his physician in Ghana for his six month follow up care.
2014-04-23T11:25:26+00:00
sorie
Two years ago in Sierra Leone, 12 year-old Sorie was sent out to buy kerosene for his family’s oil lamp and inadvertently spilled it on his shirt. That evening, as he went to use the toilet, he held the lamp
Yustince | Grossman Burn Foundation

YUSTINCE

As part of the ten day trip to Indonesia, GBF personnel used the telemedicine equipment to treat a young woman maimed in a domestic violence incident with a temporary prosthetic nose, and to begin evaluations necessary for facial reconstruction surgery. GBF staff also consulted with surgeons in Los Angeles and renowned Hollywood special effects artist, Alec Gilles, for consulting in this case.

Yustince suffered extensive injuries at the hands of her abusive husband. During an altercation, the patient's husband pinned her to the ground and severed her nose with a machete. Since the attack, the patient has worn a piece of gauze secured by surgical tape over the area. As a result, in addition to the initial wound, the patient sustained acute irritation to the area covered by surgical tape. In 2010, GBF encountered Bibi Aisha, a patient very similar to this Indonesian patient. Bibi Aisha was attacked by her Taliban husband, who severed her ears and nose as punishment for attempting to escape. Bibi Aisha miraculously survived the attack, and was featured in the July 2010 cover of TIME Magazine to symbolize the plight of Afghan women. Much like Bibi Aisha, Yustince' self-concept, sense of security and normalcy had been decimated.

In order to heal both the patient's literal and figurative wounds, GBF enlisted the help of Alec Gillis, an Academy Award-winning special-effects artist with extensive experience in prosthetics. Using facial measurements and photographs provided by GBF and IFC, Gillis designed a series of prosthetic noses for the patient that would match her facial contours and complexion. The prosthetic noses can be attached with magnets to eyeglasses or worn alone with an adhesive.

During the telemedicine session, the patient was fitted with the prosthetic, and Dr. Grossman and his team evaluated it. When the patient was first instructed to remove her temporary bandage, the GBF/IFC team became aware of her dissociation – she seemed to transport herself to another time and place to avoid the trauma of having her wound exposed. Once Rebecca Grossman fitted the patient with the prosthetic nose, the team could sense that she was able to reconnect with the present situation. She was still reserved, but Roberson noticed the first signs of her "Mona Lisa smile".

Dr. Grossman and Gillis suggested taking a mold of the patient's original nasal cavity to design a permanent prosthesis with a better fit. The patient quietly mentioned that her teenage daughter was with her, and that her nose resembled the patient's old nose. Rebecca Grossman took a mold of the patient's daughter's nose, and the team agreed that a prosthesis designed based off of the daughter's nose would be a perfect match. The permanent prosthetic nose will be available in January. Dr. Grossman also recognized that the patient would make an ideal candidate for nasal reconstruction using a paramedian forehead flap, since the patient's forehead is unscarred. This case will be reevaluated after the permanent prosthesis has been fitted to the patient in January.
2014-04-23T11:26:28+00:00
Yustince | Grossman Burn Foundation
As part of the ten day trip to Indonesia, GBF personnel used the telemedicine equipment to treat a young woman maimed in a domestic violence incident with a temporary prosthetic nose, and to begin evaluations necessary for facial reconstruction surgery.
Zubaida | Grossman Burn Foundation

Zubaida

Zubaida was 9 years old. She was a member of a nomadic family that consisted of her two parents and eight other children. She and her family are from the Farah province of Afghanistan. In August of 2001, Zubaida was pouring kerosene into an indoor home cooking stove while it was hot. The fuel ignited and she caught on fire. She sustained burns to her face, neck, chest and arms. When the fire was extinguished, her father took her to a nearby medical provider where she was given ointments. As her condition worsened, her father decided to travel to Iran for treatment. She was admitted to a hospital in Iran for 20 days and then discharged. The doctors there suggested to her father to take her home to die. Zubaida did not die, but her injuries resulted in horrible disfigurement, severe functional impairment and a crippled self-esteem.

In February, 2002, on the recommendation of local shopkeepers, Zubaida's father, Muhammad, sought help from the Americans for his severely burned daughter. She was taken to the American Army base in Kabul. There, Zubaida met with American military doctors and they decided to contact the U.S. State Department to see what could be done.

The State Department contacted Dr. Peter Grossman, a Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon at The Grossman Burn Center in Sherman Oaks, California. With the aid of the Children's Burn Foundation, a Southern California based charitable organization that lends financial and social assistance to burn-injured children who have no means of getting help any other way Zubaida was brought to America for treatment at The Grossman Burn Center.

Zubaida, completed twelve major surgeries over a course of one year and within a short period of time, the transformation was astounding. She began school for the first time in her life at Round Meadow Elementary School in Calabasas, California and learned to speak English in 12 weeks. She attended psychotherapy and physical therapy, as well as, developed many wonderful friendships with her classmates at school.
She had her first slumber party on her 11th birthday, March 22nd, 2003. Zubaida say's she would like to be a pediatric doctor and help rebuild her country when she grows up.

Virtually all who came in contact with her gravitated towards her, sorrowful over her tragedy, amazed by her courage, reveling in her transformation. So many people have come together to help this one little girl and give her something that she was almost robbed of . . . her childhood. Zubaida will always be scarred but when you meet her you realize how beautiful and vibrant she is. This triumph over tragedy story of one little girls unbreakable spirit and iron will, as well as, the goodwill of mankind is truly inspirational.
2014-04-23T11:27:56+00:00
Zubaida | Grossman Burn Foundation
Zubaida was 9 years old. She was a member of a nomadic family that consisted of her two parents and eight other children. She and her family are from the Farah province of Afghanistan. In August of 2001, Zubaida was

    Los Angeles Charities To Benefit From The Neiman Marcus Topanga Gala

    DALLAS, Texas, March 25, 2008 – Neiman Marcus announced today that four Los Angeles based charities will benefit from its Topanga store gala, to be held Thursday, September 4th 2008. ALS Association, Greater Los Angeles Chapter, Grossman Burn Foundation, The MOCA Projects Council of The Museum
    Read More

    Grossman Burn Foundation Providing Free Care to African Orphanage Worker

    SHERMAN OAKS, Calif. - Next week surgeons at the Grossman Burn Center (“GBC”) will begin treating Faith Wanjugo, a mother of three who suffered debilitating burn injuries to her arms and face while working as a volunteer cook at an AIDS orphanage in Kenya. Faith is expected to arrive in Los
    Read More

    Guess Who Came to Dinner? – Dinner with CNN’s Ali Velshi – a stellar night for Joanne King Herring By Shelby Hodge

    Long before Julia Roberts portrayed her in Charlie Wilson's War, Joanne King Herring was widely recognized as a successful volunteer diplomat and extraordinary hostess. With the dinner party that she put on Saturday night for CNN chief business correspondent Ali Velshi, she proved that her prowess
    Read More

    Grossman Burn Center Expands to Kansas City

       The Grossman Burn Center (GBC) today announced it has signed an agreement to establish a burn center at Research Medical Center in Kansas City, Mo. The eight-bed GBC facility will offer a full range of acute and reconstructive surgical care as well as an outpatient clinic. The new burn
    Read More

    Los Angeles Fire Department To Honor Burn Treatment Pioneer

    Los Angeles Fire Department To Honor Burn Treatment
    Read More

    Service Held for Dr. A. Richard Grossman, Pioneering Burn Doctor, in Hollywood

    *We just need to have this be a straight link the others I’ve sent you. These just happen to be recent and not formatted.
    Read More

    Roberta Busby, burn victim speaks out at Grossman event


    Read More

    ABC7 Eyewitness News – Indonesian woman gets new nose from Oscar-winning special effects ar


    Read More

    Surgical Fires Spark Safety Concern

    Imagine you are a patient under anesthesia in the middle of surgery, when suddenly you are engulfed in flames. This is what the FDA says happens more than 600 times every year in the U.S. Dr. Peter Grossman is the director of the Grossman Burn Center in Los Angeles. He says the trouble occurs
    Read More

  • Grossman Burn Foundation Establishes First-Ever Telemedicine Based Burn Treatment Center

    Humanitarian Mission Brought State-of-the-Art Equipment, Supplies & Medical Care to Remote Indonesian Island CALABASAS, CA, February 6, 2013—On December 4, 2012 in Kusuri, Indonesia, the Grossman Burn Foundation (GBF) launched the first ever international burn treatment program utilizing
    Read More

  • VSee, DLR, Grossman Burn Foundation, and Hollywood Special Effects Legend Team Up To Help Victims of Domestic Violence


    Read More

  • Bibi Aisha, Disfigured Afghan Woman Featured On ‘Time’ Cover, Visits U.S

    She was so beautiful that the first time I saw Bibi Aisha on the cover of Time magazine, it took me a moment to realize she didn't have a nose. Her husband and his family had hacked it off when she'd tried to escape being abused in her home. The magazine said she was the graphically horrifying
    Read More

  • Afghan Woman Whose Nose and Ears Were Cut Off Travels to U.S.

    Bibi Aisha, a young Afghan wife whose ears and nose were cut off by her husband, is heading to the United States on Wednesday for reconstructive surgery. Aisha made headlines and was on a recent cover of Time magazine, showing the plight of women in Afghanistan. "When they cut off my nose and
    Read More

  • Grossman Burn Foundation Providing Shelter for Haitian Earthquake Victims

    SHERMAN OAKS, Calif.--(EON: Enhanced Online News)--The Grossman Burn Foundation (GBF) announced today that it has sent thirteen portable housing units and other supplies to Haiti as part of the ongoing relief effort following the devastating January 12, 2010 earthquake in that nation. The GBF
    Read More

    Woman Burned in Vicious Gasoline Attack Gathers Strength to Help Others

    Roberta Busby has learned to smash her sandwiches down so she can bite into them, to style her hair a certain way to hide her ears. She can face the stares from the public, but she still tries to avoid mirrors. Yet when she does look, the reflection she sees back isn't of a victim of a
    Read More

    Family of Iraqi boy who was set on fire is granted asylum in the U.S

    Youssif was doused in gas and set ablaze in 2007. He's being treated at the Grossman Burn Center. Youssif, his parents and younger sister fear they'll be harmed if they return to Baghdad. An Iraqi boy who was set on fire while playing outside his Baghdad house in 2007 has been granted asylum to
    Read More

    St. Luke’s Partners With Grossman Burn Centers of California to Bring Arizonans a Restorative Approach to Burn Treatment.

    May 4, 2011 – St. Luke's Medical Center announced today that it has signed an agreement with Grossman Burn Centers (GBC) of West Hills, Calif., to establish a new burn center specializing in a multidisciplinary approach that seeks to provide life-saving medical care and restore patients as close
    Read More

    Grossman Burn Centers Opens Phoenix, AZ Burn Unit

    New Facility at St. Luke's Medical Center is the 5th Grossman Burn Center and the Second Unit Outside of California Grossman Burn Centers ("GBC") announced the official opening of its new Phoenix, Arizona burn center at St. Luke's Medical Center. The eight-bed unit is the fifth Grossman Burn
    Read More

    The Rise Of Hash Oil Lab Explosions Leads To Influx Of Burn Patients In Southern California.

    Due to increased demand for solidified hash oil, drug users and dealers are doing their worst Walter White impressions all across the southland and with catastrophic results. Peter Grossman, Chairman of the Grossman Burn Centers and President of the Grossman Burn Foundation speaks about the
    Read More

    Grossman Burn Foundation Receives Grant From The Liberty Company & Fireman’s Fund

      Yesterday, the Grossman Burn Foundation graciously accepted a grant from the Liberty Company Insurance Brokers and Fireman's Fund to directly fund The Humanitarian Assistance Manual. Jerry Pickett, CEO of the Liberty Company presented the check and reiterated that a continued partnership would
    Read More